REFORMED EPISTEMOLOGY

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements
Translator’s note
General introduction

Logos and Ratio

  1. Introduction (1–6)
  2. Ancient philosophy (7–47)
    1. Pre-Socratics (11–13)
    2. Socrates (14–17)
    3. Plato (18–25)
    4. Aristotle (26–39)
    5. Post-Aristotelian developments (40–41)
    6. Stoics (42–47)
  3. The Patristic period (48–61)
  4. The Middle Ages (62–91)
    1. The reality of universals (65–69)
    2. How knowledge rises (70–73)
    3. The relation of faith and knowledge (74–91)
      1. Augustinian trend (80–84)
      2. Other trends (85–91)
  5. The Reformation (92–100)
  6. Renaissance humanism (101–112)
  7. Post-Renaissance humanism and science (113–117)
  8. Modern rationalism (118–207)
    1. Prominent 17th century figures (120–122)
    2. G.W. Leibniz (123–129)
    3. I. Kant (130–144)
    4. Absolute idealism: J.G. Fichte, F.W.J. Schelling, G.W.F. Hegel (145–161)
    5. Some mid-19th century figures (162)
    6. B. Bolzano (163–167)
    7. Other mid-19th century figures (168–169)
    8. Of the Marburgers: H. Cohen (170–177)
    9. Of the Freiburgers: H. Rickert (178–193)
    10. F. Brentano and E. Husserl (194–206)
    11. Epistemological forecast (207)
  9. A personal word (208–226)

Translator’s Postscript
Index